Evista 60 Mg 28 Tablets Daiichi Sankyo

Evista 60 Mg 28 Tablets Daiichi Sankyo

Brand:DAIICHI SANKYO Pharmaceuticals
Product Code:199
Availability:In Stock

FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: CONTENTS*

WARNING: INCREASED RISK OF VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM AND DEATH FROM STROKE

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

1.1 Treatment and Prevention of Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women

1.2 Reduction in the Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women with Osteoporosis

1.3 Reduction in the Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women at High Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

2.1 Recommended Dosing

2.2 Recommendations for Calcium and Vitamin D Supplementation

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

4.1 Venous Thromboembolism

4.2 Pregnancy, Women Who May Become Pregnant, and Nursing Mothers

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Venous Thromboembolism

5.2 Death Due to Stroke

5.3 Cardiovascular Disease

5.4 Premenopausal Use

5.5 Hepatic Impairment

5.6 Concomitant Estrogen Therapy

5.7 History of Hypertriglyceridemia when Treated with Estrogens

5.8 Renal Impairment

5.9 History of Breast Cancer

5.10 Use in Men

5.11 Unexplained Uterine Bleeding

5.12 Breast Abnormalities

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

6.1 Clinical Trials Experience

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Cholestyramine

7.2 Warfarin

7.3 Other Highly Protein-Bound Drugs

7.4 Systemic Estrogens

7.5 Other Concomitant Medications

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

8.3 Nursing Mothers

8.4 Pediatric Use

8.5 Geriatric Use

8.6 Renal Impairment

8.7 Hepatic Impairment

10 OVERDOSAGE

11 DESCRIPTION

12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

12.1 Mechanism of Action

12.2 Pharmacodynamics

12.3 Pharmacokinetics

13 NONCLINICAL TOXICOLOGY

13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

13.2 Animal Toxicology and/or Pharmacology

14 CLINICAL STUDIES

14.1 Treatment of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

14.2 Prevention of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

14.3 Reduction in Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women with Osteoporosis

14.4 Reduction in Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women at High Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer

14.5 Effects on Cardiovascular Disease

16 HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING

16.1 How Supplied

16.2 Storage and Handling

17 PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION

17.1 Osteoporosis Recommendations, Including Calcium and Vitamin D Supplementation

17.2 Patient Immobilization

17.3 Hot Flashes or Flushes

17.4 Reduction in Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women with Osteoporosis or at High Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer

*Sections or subsections omitted from the full prescribing information are not listed.

FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION

WARNING: INCREASED RISK OF VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM AND DEATH FROM STROKE

Increased risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism have been reported with EVISTA [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Women with active or past history of venous thromboembolism should not take EVISTA [see Contraindications (4.1)].
Increased risk of death due to stroke occurred in a trial in postmenopausal women with documented coronary heart disease or at increased risk for major coronary events. Consider risk-benefit balance in women at risk for stroke [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Studies (14.5)].
1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

1.1 Treatment and Prevention of Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women

EVISTA is indicated for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women [see Clinical Studies (14.1, 14.2)].

1.2 Reduction in the Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women with Osteoporosis

EVISTA is indicated for the reduction in risk of invasive breast cancer in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis [see Clinical Studies (14.3)].

1.3 Reduction in the Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women at High Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer

EVISTA is indicated for the reduction in risk of invasive breast cancer in postmenopausal women at high risk of invasive breast cancer [see Clinical Studies (14.4)].

The effect in the reduction in the incidence of breast cancer was shown in a study of postmenopausal women at high risk for breast cancer with a 5-year planned duration with a median follow-up of 4.3 years [see Clinical Studies (14.4)]. Twenty-seven percent of the participants received drug for 5 years. The long-term effects and the recommended length of treatment are not known.

High risk of breast cancer is defined as at least one breast biopsy showing lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) or atypical hyperplasia, one or more first-degree relatives with breast cancer, or a 5-year predicted risk of breast cancer ≥1.66% (based on the modified Gail model). Among the factors included in the modified Gail model are the following: current age, number of first-degree relatives with breast cancer, number of breast biopsies, age at menarche, nulliparity or age of first live birth. Healthcare professionals can obtain a Gail Model Risk Assessment Tool by dialing 1-800-545-5979. Currently, no single clinical finding or test result can quantify risk of breast cancer with certainty.

After an assessment of the risk of developing breast cancer, the decision regarding therapy with EVISTA should be based upon an individual assessment of the benefits and risks.

EVISTA does not eliminate the risk of breast cancer. Patients should have breast exams and mammograms before starting EVISTA and should continue regular breast exams and mammograms in keeping with good medical practice after beginning treatment with EVISTA.

Important Limitations of Use for Breast Cancer Risk Reduction

There are no data available regarding the effect of EVISTA on invasive breast cancer incidence in women with inherited mutations (BRCA1, BRCA2) to be able to make specific recommendations on the effectiveness of EVISTA.
EVISTA is not indicated for the treatment of invasive breast cancer or reduction of the risk of recurrence.
EVISTA is not indicated for the reduction in the risk of noninvasive breast cancer.
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

2.1 Recommended Dosing

The recommended dosage is one 60 mg EVISTA (raloxifene hydrochloride tablets) tablet daily, which may be administered any time of day without regard to meals [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

For the indications in risk of invasive breast cancer the optimum duration of treatment is not known [see Clinical Studies (14.3, 14.4)].

2.2 Recommendations for Calcium and Vitamin D Supplementation

For either osteoporosis treatment or prevention, supplemental calcium and/or vitamin D should be added to the diet if daily intake is inadequate. Postmenopausal women require an average of 1500 mg/day of elemental calcium. Total daily intake of calcium above 1500 mg has not demonstrated additional bone benefits while daily intake above 2000 mg has been associated with increased risk of adverse effects, including hypercalcemia and kidney stones. The recommended intake of vitamin D is 400-800 IU daily. Patients at increased risk for vitamin D insufficiency (e.g., over the age of 70 years, nursing home bound, or chronically ill) may need additional vitamin D supplements. Patients with gastrointestinal malabsorption syndromes may require higher doses of vitamin D supplementation and measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D should be considered.

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

60 mg, white, elliptical, film-coated tablets (not scored). They are imprinted on one side with LILLY and the tablet code 4165 in edible blue ink.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

4.1 Venous Thromboembolism

EVISTA is contraindicated in women with active or past history of venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and retinal vein thrombosis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

4.2 Pregnancy, Women Who May Become Pregnant, and Nursing Mothers

EVISTA is contraindicated in pregnancy, in women who may become pregnant, and in nursing mothers [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1, 8.3)]. EVISTA may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. If this drug is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus.

In rabbit studies, abortion and a low rate of fetal heart anomalies (ventricular septal defects) occurred in rabbits at doses ≥0.1 mg/kg (≥0.04 times the human dose based on surface area, mg/m2), and hydrocephaly was observed in fetuses at doses ≥10 mg/kg (≥4 times the human dose based on surface area, mg/m2). In rat studies, retardation of fetal development and developmental abnormalities (wavy ribs, kidney cavitation) occurred at doses ≥1 mg/kg (≥0.2 times the human dose based on surface area, mg/m2). Treatment of rats at doses of 0.1 to 10 mg/kg (0.02 to 1.6 times the human dose based on surface area, mg/m2) during gestation and lactation produced effects that included delayed and disrupted parturition; decreased neonatal survival and altered physical development; sex- and age-specific reductions in growth and changes in pituitary hormone content; and decreased lymphoid compartment size in offspring. At 10 mg/kg, raloxifene disrupted parturition, which resulted in maternal and progeny death and morbidity. Effects in adult offspring (4 months of age) included uterine hypoplasia and reduced fertility; however, no ovarian or vaginal pathology was observed.

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Venous Thromboembolism

In clinical trials, EVISTA-treated women had an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism). Other venous thromboembolic events also could occur. A less serious event, superficial thrombophlebitis, also has been reported more frequently with EVISTA than with placebo. The greatest risk for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism occurs during the first 4 months of treatment, and the magnitude of risk appears to be similar to the reported risk associated with use of hormone therapy. Because immobilization increases the risk for venous thromboembolic events independent of therapy, EVISTA should be discontinued at least 72 hours prior to and during prolonged immobilization (e.g., post-surgical recovery, prolonged bed rest), and EVISTA therapy should be resumed only after the patient is fully ambulatory. In addition, women taking EVISTA should be advised to move about periodically during prolonged travel. The risk-benefit balance should be considered in women at risk of thromboembolic disease for other reasons, such as congestive heart failure, superficial thrombophlebitis, and active malignancy [see Contraindications (4.1) and Adverse Reactions (6.1)].

5.2 Death Due to Stroke

In a clinical trial of postmenopausal women with documented coronary heart disease or at increased risk for coronary events, an increased risk of death due to stroke was observed after treatment with EVISTA. During an average follow-up of 5.6 years, 59 (1.2%) EVISTA-treated women died due to a stroke compared to 39 (0.8%) placebo-treated women (22 versus 15 per 10,000 women-years; hazard ratio 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-2.24; p=0.0499). There was no statistically significant difference between treatment groups in the incidence of stroke (249 in EVISTA [4.9%] versus 224 placebo [4.4%]). EVISTA had no significant effect on all-cause mortality. The risk-benefit balance should be considered in women at risk for stroke, such as prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), atrial fibrillation, hypertension, or cigarette smoking [see Clinical Studies (14.5)].

5.3 Cardiovascular Disease

EVISTA should not be used for the primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In a clinical trial of postmenopausal women with documented coronary heart disease or at increased risk for coronary events, no cardiovascular benefit was demonstrated after treatment with raloxifene for 5 years [see Clinical Studies (14.5)].

5.4 Premenopausal Use

There is no indication for premenopausal use of EVISTA. Safety of EVISTA in premenopausal women has not been established and its use is not recommended.

5.5 Hepatic Impairment

EVISTA should be used with caution in patients with hepatic impairment. Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients with hepatic impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

5.6 Concomitant Estrogen Therapy

The safety of concomitant use of EVISTA with systemic estrogens has not been established and its use is not recommended.

5.7 History of Hypertriglyceridemia when Treated with Estrogens

Limited clinical data suggest that some women with a history of marked hypertriglyceridemia (>5.6 mmol/L or >500 mg/dL) in response to treatment with oral estrogen or estrogen plus progestin may develop increased levels of triglycerides when treated with EVISTA. Women with this medical history should have serum triglycerides monitored when taking EVISTA.

5.8 Renal Impairment

EVISTA should be used with caution in patients with moderate or severe renal impairment. Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients with moderate or severe renal impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

5.9 History of Breast Cancer

EVISTA has not been adequately studied in women with a prior history of breast cancer.

5.10 Use in Men

There is no indication for the use of EVISTA in men. EVISTA has not been adequately studied in men and its use is not recommended.

5.11 Unexplained Uterine Bleeding

Any unexplained uterine bleeding should be investigated as clinically indicated. EVISTA-treated and placebo-treated groups had similar incidences of endometrial proliferation [see Clinical Studies (14.1, 14.2)].

5.12 Breast Abnormalities

Any unexplained breast abnormality occurring during EVISTA therapy should be investigated. EVISTA does not eliminate the risk of breast cancer [see Clinical Studies (14.4)].

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

6.1 Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The data described below reflect exposure to EVISTA in 8429 patients who were enrolled in placebo-controlled trials, including 6666 exposed for 1 year and 5685 for at least 3 years.

Osteoporosis Treatment Clinical Trial (MORE) — The safety of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporosis was assessed in a large (7705 patients) multinational, placebo-controlled trial. Duration of treatment was 36 months, and 5129 postmenopausal women were exposed to raloxifene hydrochloride (2557 received 60 mg/day, and 2572 received 120 mg/day). The incidence of all-cause mortality was similar among groups: 23 (0.9%) placebo, 13 (0.5%) EVISTA-treated (raloxifene HCl 60 mg), and 28 (1.1%) raloxifene HCl 120 mg women died. Therapy was discontinued due to an adverse reaction in 10.9% of EVISTA-treated women and 8.8% of placebo-treated women.

Venous Thromboembolism: The most serious adverse reaction related to EVISTA was VTE (deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and retinal vein thrombosis). During an average of study-drug exposure of 2.6 years, VTE occurred in about 1 out of 100 patients treated with EVISTA. Twenty-six EVISTA-treated women had a VTE compared to 11 placebo-treated women, the hazard ratio was 2.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.2, 4.5), and the highest VTE risk was during the initial months of treatment.

Common adverse reactions considered to be related to EVISTA therapy were hot flashes and leg cramps. Hot flashes occurred in about one in 10 patients on EVISTA and were most commonly reported during the first 6 months of treatment and were not different from placebo thereafter. Leg cramps occurred in about one in 14 patients on EVISTA.

Placebo-Controlled Osteoporosis Prevention Clinical Trials — The safety of raloxifene has been assessed primarily in 12 Phase 2 and Phase 3 studies with placebo, estrogen, and estrogen-progestin therapy control groups. The duration of treatment ranged from 2 to 30 months, and 2036 women were exposed to raloxifene HCl (371 patients received 10 to 50 mg/day, 828 received 60 mg/day, and 837 received from 120 to 600 mg/day).

Therapy was discontinued due to an adverse reaction in 11.4% of 581 EVISTA-treated women and 12.2% of 584 placebo-treated women. Discontinuation rates due to hot flashes did not differ significantly between EVISTA and placebo groups (1.7% and 2.2%, respectively).

Common adverse reactions considered to be drug-related were hot flashes and leg cramps. Hot flashes occurred in about one in four patients on EVISTA versus about one in six on placebo. The first occurrence of hot flashes was most commonly reported during the first 6 months of treatment.

Table 1 lists adverse reactions occurring in either the osteoporosis treatment or in five prevention placebo-controlled clinical trials at a frequency ≥2.0% in either group and in more EVISTA-treated women than in placebo-treated women. Adverse reactions are shown without attribution of causality. The majority of adverse reactions occurring during the studies were mild and generally did not require discontinuation of therapy.

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